Virtual histology slide box

Abstract

The virtual histology slide box provides an introduction to the histology of general tissue types and specific organ systems. Each specimen is accompanied by a caption that provides information on staining, magnification, and the structures shown. Virtual microscopy is provided in cooperation with Smart Zoom. Complementary to this Learning Card, the virtual histopathology slide box contains numerous images of captioned histopathological specimens with the same virtual microscopy feature.

General histology

General histology distinguishes between four basic types of animal tissue.

The following sections provide a range of examples for subtypes of each of these four basic types of tissue. Specific organ tissues are presented in the section on histology of organ systems below.

Epithelial tissue

Surface epithelium

Simple squamous epithelium

Intestinal serosa (= visceral peritoneum)

Pulmonary alveoli (type1 alveolar cells as an example of specialized epithelium)

Nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium

Tongue

Esophagus

Keratinized stratified squamous epithelium

Skin (epidermis)

Simple cuboidal epithelium

Kidney (epithelium of the proximal tubule)

Ovarian surface epithelium

Stratified cuboidal epithelium

Duct epithelium of sebaceous glands

Simple columnar epithelium

Colon epithelium

Pseudostratified columnar epithelium

Respiratory epithelium

Stratified columnar epithelium

Conjunctiva

Glandular epithelium

Acinar glands (serous glands)

Tubular glands (mucus glands)

Tubuloacinar glands (seromucous glands)

Tubuloalveolar glands

Tubuloalveolar glands in serous glands (lacrimal gland)

Tubuloalveolar glands in mucus glands (Brunner glands in the duodenum)

Connective tissue

Connective tissue

Loose connective tissue

Submucosa of the esophagus

Dense connective tissue

Stroma of cornea

Adipose tissue

White adipose tissue

Atrophic thymus

Cartilaginous tissue

Hyaline cartilage

Elastic cartilage

Bone tissue

Fetal bone (woven/fibrous bone)

Bone formation by intramembranous ossification

Bone formation by endochondral ossification

Mature bone (secondary/lamellar bone)

Compact bone

Trabecular bone

Muscle tissue

Striated muscle

Skeletal muscle

Cardiac muscle

Smooth muscle

Myometrium

Nervous tissue

Cerebellum

Basal ganglia

Soma of a parasympathetic ganglion

Peripheral nerve

Histology of organ systems

The following sections will provide examples of these specific organ tissues:

Slides of fetal tissue can be found in both the individual organ sections and a separate section on fetal histology to enable quick comparison of fetal and adult tissues in the anatomical context as well as provide to easy reference in the embryological context.

Organs of the circulatory system

Heart

Aortic valve

Aorta

Blood vessels

Respiratory tract and lungs

Nasal wall

Epiglottis

Trachea

Lungs

Blood and hematopoiesis

Blood

Blood smear

Hematopoiesis

Hematopoiesis in adults

Fetal hematopoiesis (in the liver)

Lymphoid organs

Primary lymphoid organs

Bone marrow

Thymus

Thymus in children

Thymus in adults

Secondary lymphoid organs

Spleen

Lymph nodes

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)

Tonsils

Intestinal MALT (e.g., Peyer patch in the ileum)

Digestive system

Oral cavity

Tongue

Teeth

Large salivary glands

Parotid glands

Submandibular glands

Sublingual glands

Esophagus

Stomach

Small intestine

Duodenum

Jejunum

Ileum

Large intestine (colon)

Appendix

Accessory organs of the digestive tract

Kidneys and the urinary tract

Kidney

Urinary tract

Ureter

Urinary bladder

Urethra

Urethra (female)

Urethra (male)

For the male urethra, see transverse section of the penis below.

Female reproductive organs

Ovaries

Fallopian tube

Uterus

Cervix

Changes in the endometrium during the menstrual cycle

Placenta

Male reproductive organs

Testes

Seminal tract and accessory glands

Epididymis

Vas deferens

Prostate

Transverse section of the penis

Spermatozoa in ejaculate

Endocrine organs

Thyroid gland

Parathyroid gland

Adrenal gland

Skin with skin appendages and mammary glands

Skin with skin appendages

There are two types of skin: hairy skin and glabrous (hairless) skin. Hairy skin is less keratinized than glabrous skin and contains all types of skin appendages (eccrine sweat glands, apocrine sweat glands, sebaceous glands, hair, and nails). In contrast, glabrous skin is highly keratinized and only contains eccrine sweat glands.

Glabrous (hairless) skin

Hairy skin

Mammary gland

Mammary glands are modified apocrine sweat glands and are therefore classified as skin appendages.

Sensory organs

Eyes

Eyeball

Accessory organs of the eye

Ear

Auricle

Inner ear

Nasal wall

Fetal histology

Tooth development

Lungs

Liver

Kidneys and adrenal glands

Ossification

For images of bone tissue during ossification, see sections on bone formation by intramembranous ossification and bone formation by endochondral ossification.

last updated 08/31/2018
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