Insider Tips For Nailing Your Residency Interview

Insider Tips For Nailing Your Residency Interview

What are program directors looking for in potential residents? There’s no question—they want to be wowed! To knock their socks off, you must go in with confidence and simply be yourself. Show them how you’ll be a good fit in their program and that your demeanor would perfectly suit all those patient encounters. Dr. Johanna Hase, who completed her internal medicine residency at NYU, shares her advice on nailing your interview and matching into the program of your dreams.

Learn More & Save Time In Medical School

Learn More & Save Time In Medical School

Did you know that our comprehensive Qbank is crosslinked with an extensive medical library? This means that every question within our Qbank directly corresponds with an integrated Learning Card, giving you the option to dive deeper into any medically-related topic. You’ll never have to leave our app to expand your knowledge – a feature no other medical learning resource offers. See how it works!

Stop the Bullying in Medical School

Stop the Bullying in Medical School

Becoming a doctor requires more than countless hours on the wards, an endless amount of standardized exams and years spent in training. For the most part, this involves a huge number of positives: lifelong friendships with classmates and colleagues and memorable interactions with patients. Unfortunately, for some medical students, verbal and physical harassment by peers and superiors is part of this process too.
 

A Mother and Resident

A Mother and Resident

Imagine the scenario. You're a medical resident logging between 80 and 100 hours per week. You tackle additional commitments at night, including answering emails, working on required research projects, studying, and, oh yeah, raising a child. For Lacey Vence, a resident at the University of Louisville and mother of one, her hours spent at the hospital go hand-in-hand with the challenges of being a mother. Like many residents, Lacey matched far from home, away from her support system. To fulfill her residency duties, she moved three hours away, raising her two-year-old by herself during the week, with weekend visits from her husband, who works full-time in West Virginia. Here are some valuable tips on balancing the rigors of the medical profession with raising a family - from a mother’s perspective.

Managing USMLE Step 2 Test Anxiety

Managing USMLE Step 2 Test Anxiety

Do you feel completely confident walking into your USMLE™ Step 2 exam? Don’t worry - you’re not alone. Test anxiety for medical students is very common, and although the jitters can be a boost for your motivation to study, high levels of stress can interfere with your test performance. Looking for some tips to make sure you are really ready to go on the big day? Tim Dang, a 4th year medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine, provides us with some tips on how to best prepare for the Step 2 exam. 

Broken Heart Syndrome: A Different Kind of Heart Attack

Broken Heart Syndrome: A Different Kind of Heart Attack

This Valentine’s Day, you may treat a few broken-hearted patients. As a medical student, you may know that a broken heart is an actual medical condition called takotsubo cardiomyopathy, with around 7,000 diagnosed cases per year in the United States. One notable case occurred last year, when Debbie Reynolds passed away just one day after the death of her daughter, actress, Carrie Fisher (Princess Leia - Star Wars). While Reynold’s cause of death was determined to be a stroke, her condition was induced by extreme stress (the loss of her daughter), which led to a temporary disruption of the heart’s normal pumping function.

Balancing Act: Raising a Family During Med School

Balancing Act: Raising a Family During Med School

Balancing your medical career with raising a family is no easy task. Ryan Kelsch, who will soon begin his diagnostic radiology residency at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak (Michigan) and is a USMLE and Comlex tutor for Med School Tutors, shares with us the joys and challenges of being a parent during medical school. Here is some practical advice on balancing parental responsibilities with med school.

Blood Donations: It Takes All Types

Blood Donations: It Takes All Types

Blood donations often drop at the beginning of the year due to the holidays, hectic travel schedules, bad weather and sickness. That’s why January is National Blood Donor Month – to encourage giving blood and boosting the seasonal short supply. To help understand why medical students often avoid this simple, yet lifesaving act, we took some inspiration from Marie Nguyen, a medical student at Griffith University (Australia). Marie coordinates her university’s student society blood donation campaign and helps run the Vampire Cup - an annual blood donation competition between medical schools in Australia. Here are three reasons why you, as a medical student, might want to consider donating this month.

Doctors That D.O.

Doctors That D.O.

Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.s) are one of the fastest-growing segments of healthcare professionals in the U.S. (Osteopathic Medical Profession Report, 2017). Is AMBOSS a suitable resource for D.O. students? We sat down with Sulaman Durrani, a D.O. medical student at Liberty University College Of Osteopathic Medicine (LUCOM), located in Lynchburg, Virginia. In this article, Sulaman explains why he chose to attend a D.O. school and which resources he uses to help him study more efficiently. 

Top 5 Reasons For Holiday ER Visits

Top 5 Reasons For Holiday ER Visits

So, you’ve just started your clinical rotations, with a major holiday coming up. Imagine this scenario: relaxation; peace and quiet; time with family and friends. While this all may sound magical, as a medical student, don’t get too comfortable just yet. Instead, prepare yourself for the ER. It’s no secret that the holiday season corresponds with increased hospital visits. Here are five reasons you may see an influx of patients this holiday season.